Current Lab Members (by project)

Characterization of amyloid-beta oligomers

Thomas J. Esparza, Senior Technician and Lab Manager (2007-) esparzat@neuro.wustl.edu
TJ is working on the development of methods for improved purification of Alzheimer’s disease proteins for downstream characterization within our research group. Our goal is to identify potential therapeutic targets which are primarily responsible to toxicity throughout the disease course.
Hao Jiang, PhD. Post-doctoral fellow (2014-) jiangha@neuro.wustl.edu
Hao is currently working on two major projects. The first is focused on identification of synaptic toxic components in Alzheimer’s diseases patient tissue, by developing a live-cell imaging based synaptic toxicity assay using primary neurons with endogenous fluorescent synaptic proteins. The second project involves purification of amyloid-beta oligomers from human and mouse brain and structural characterization of amyloid-beta oligomers with chemical and biochemical approaches.Jiang_H_image3
Wildburger_N Norelle Wildburger, PhD Post-doctoral fellow (2015-) wildburgern@neuro.wustl.edu
Norelle is focused on the analysis of Alzheimer’s disease proteins by mass spectrometry. Her goal is to identify proteins primarily responsible for toxicity throughout the disease course, which can be targeted with novel therapeutics.

Mechanisms of amyloid-beta and tau pathologies

Rong_X Xianfang Rong, PhD. Post-doctoral fellow (2014-) rongx@neuro.wustl.edu
Xianfang is working to quantify amyloid-beta oligomers in mice following age and traumatic brain injury.
Floros_T Theodore G. Floros. Technician (2014-) florost@neuro.wustl.edu
Ted is currently focused on utilizing Array Tomography and standard immunohistochemistry to study dendritic and axonal injury after concussion and traumatic brain injury within mouse models. Previously, Ted has worked on the synaptotoxic effects of Amyloid-Beta Oligomers and assisted with other projects within the lab.

Injured axons in uninjured sham (left) and repetitive traumatic brain injury (right) in a mouse model of repeated traumatic brain injury

Injured axons in uninjured sham (left) and repetitive traumatic brain injury (right) in a mouse model of repeated traumatic brain injury


Detection of TBI pathology using advanced diffusion imaging

Joong Hee ‘Caleb’ Kim, PhD. Research Instructor (2013-) kimjo@neuro.wustl.edu
Caleb is a research instructor working to develop advanced diffusion imaging methods in both ex vivo human brain tissue and in vivo mouse brain. He is also interested in the development and application of these advanced diffusion MRI methods to the human brain in vivo.

Kim_J_4

Fractional anisotropy, generalized fractional anisotropy, and mean kurtosis is measured using high resolution advanced diffusion MRI in human ex vivo brain tissue

Holleran_L Laurena Holleran, PhD. Post-doctoral fellow (2014-) holleranl@neuro.wustl.edu
Laurena is focused on quantitative radiological-pathological correlations in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) using advanced diffusion MRI. Additionally, she is also interested in investigating whether these advanced imaging methods are applicable in a clinical setting with the long term goal of using noninvasive methods to diagnose CTE in living patients.

Phosphorylated tau threads and tangles (top), along with microglia are apparent in the sulci of human CTE tissue

Phosphorylated tau threads and tangles (top), along with microglia are apparent in the sulci of human CTE tissue

Gangolli_M Mihika Gangolli. Biomedical Engineering PhD Student (2014-) mihika.gangolli@wustl.edu
Mihika is working to develop quantitative radiological-pathological correlation methods in brain tissue. These methods include histology to MRI image coregistration and the development of histology derived metrics which can then be correlated to advanced diffusion MRI data. She is also interested in application of these methods to an in vivo traumatic brain injury model to determine whether advanced diffusion MRI correlates of histological markers can be used to predict long term PTSD, depressive, and anxiety-related behavior.

Curving fibers in a sulcus of human brain tissue are identified using diffusion MRI and histology in corresponding sections.

Curving fibers in a sulcus of human brain tissue are identified using diffusion MRI and histology in corresponding sections.

Kummer_T Terrance Kummer, MD PhD. Assistant Professor of Neurology (2012-) kummert@neuro.wustl.edu
Dr. Kummer’s research is focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying neuronal trauma and degeneration during and following acute brain injury through the use of advanced brain imaging and monitoring techniques available both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. Current work includes studying dendritic injury following traumatic brain injury, and severe traumatic brain injury using a rotational acceleration model of traumatic brain injury in mice.
Sauerbeck_A Andrew Sauerbeck, PhD. Post-doctoral fellow (2015-) sauerbecka@neuro.wustl.edu
Andrew is developing a mouse model of severe traumatic brain injury using a rotational acceleration model. He is studying the resulting dendritic injury that occurs, and is also interested in the characterization of microglia following traumatic brain injury.

Friess_S Stuart Friess, MD. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (2012-) Friess_S@kids.wustl.edu
Dr. Friess has a strong background in translational neurocritical care with specific training and expertise in large and small animal modelling of traumatic brain injury. Previous work has included developing neurobehavioral outcome measures in a swine model of head injury and multimodal intracranial monitoring in swine models of traumatic brain injury and cardiac arrest. Currently, Dr. Friess’s research is focused on studying the effects of delayed secondary insults on white matter injury following traumatic brain injury.
Jacobs_A Addison Jacobs: technician (2015-) Jacobs_A@kids.wustl.edu
Addison is using histological staining methods and neurobehavioral outcome measures to study the effects of delayed hypoxia on white matter injury following traumatic brain injury in a mouse model.

Alejandra Camacho-Soto, MD, Instructor of Neurology, PM&R (2015-) camacho-sotoa@neuro.wustl.edu
Paul Jang, BME PhD rotation student (2015-) pjang@wustl.edu
Allison Soung, Neuroscience PhD rotation student (2015-) alsoung@wustl.edu
Anna Noronha, Undergraduate student (2015-) anoronha@wustl.edu
Lisa Soumekh, Undergraduate student (2015-) lsoumekh@wustl.edu
Kara Skjoldager, Undergraduate student (2015-) karaeskjoldager@wustl.edu
Erik Hsu: Undergraduate student (2015-) e.hsu@wustl.edu
Angela Lumba, MD. Instructor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (2012-) Lumba_A@kids.wustl.edu
Uma Parikh, Undergraduate student (2013-) umang.parikh@hotmail.com
Simi Ghosh, PhD. Post-doctoral fellow (2014-) ghoshs@neuro.wustl.edu