Robin C Ryther, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Phone314-454-6120

Emailrytherr@neuro.wustl.edu

Board Certifications

  • Neurology with Special Qualification in Child Neurology - Certified

Related Links

Publications

  • Larson AM, Ryther RC, Jennesson M, Geffrey AL, Bruno PL, Anagnos CJ, Shoeb AH, Thibert RL, Thiele EA. Impact of pediatric epilepsy on sleep patterns and behaviors in children and parents. Epilepsia. 2012 July;53(7):1162-9.
  • Ryther RC and Wong M. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition: potential for antiseizure, antiepileptogenic, and epileptostatic therapy. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2012 Aug;12(4):410-8.
  • Ryther RC, Cho-Park YA, and Lee JW. Carotid dissection in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. J Neurol. 2011 May;258(5):912-4.
  • Klein JP and Ryther RC. Central Nervous System Hemorrhage. NEJM. 2009 Oct:361:18.
  • Shariat N, Ryther RC, Phillips JA 3rd, Robinson, IC, Patton JG. Rescue of Pituitary Function in a Mouse Model of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency Type II by RNA Interference. Endocrinology. 2007 Feb;149(2):580-6.
  • Ryther RC, Flynt AS, Phillips JA 3rd, Patton JG. siRNA therapeutics: big potential from small RNAs. Gene Ther. 2005 Jan;12(1):5-11.
  • Ryther RC, Flynt AS, Harris BD, Phillips JA 3rd, Patton JG. GH1 splicing is regulated by multiple enhancers whose mutation produces a dominant-negative GH isoform that can be degraded by allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Endocrinology. 2004 Jun;145(6):2988-96.
  • Ryther RC, McGuinness LM, Phillips JA 3rd, Moseley CT, Magoulas CB, Robinson IC, Patton JG. Disruption of exon definition produces a dominant-negative growth hormone isoform that causes somatotroph death and IGHD II. Hum Genet. 2003 Jul;113(2):140-8.
  • Abou-Khalil B, Ge Q, Desai R, Ryther R, Bazyk A, Bailey R, Haines JL, Sutcliffe JS, George AL Jr. Partial and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus and a novel SCN1A mutation. Neurology. 2001 Dec 26;57(12):2265-72.

Dr. Robin Ryther is an Assistant Professor of Neurology and has been at Washington University School of Medicine and Saint Louis Children’s Hospital since 2011, initially completing her Neurophysiology and Pediatric Epilepsy Fellowships. Her primary focus is the clinical care care of children with refractory epilepsy, epilepsy surgery, and new onset seizures. She also has a special interest in Rett Syndrome and early epileptic encephalopathies.