Anneliese Schaefer, JD, PhD

Associate Professor of Neurology

Phone314-747-3429

Fax314-362-0338

Emailamschaefer@wustl.edu

Additional Titles

  • Executive Director, Hope Center for Neurological Disorders
  • Director, Office of Neuroscience Research

Related Links

Publications

  • Schaefer AM, Hadwiger GD, and Nonet, ML (2000). rpm-1, a conserved neuronal gene that regulates targeting and synaptogenesis in C. elegans. Neuron 26, 345-356.
  • Schaefer AM and Nonet ML (2001). Molecular and cellular insights into presynaptic assembly. Curr Opin Neurobiol 11, 127-134.
  • Hewes RS, Park D, Gauthier SA, Schaefer AM, and Taghert PH (2003). The bHLH protein Dimmed controls neuroendocrine cell differentiation in Drosophila. Development 130, 1771-81.
  • Koushika SP, Schaefer AM, Vincent R, Willis J, Bowerman B., and Nonet ML (2004). Mutations in C. elegans cytoplasmic dynein components reveal specificity of neuronal retrograde cargo. J Neurosci 24, 3907-16.
  • Schaefer AM, Sanes JR, and Lichtman JW (2005). A compensatory subpopulation of motor neurons in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Comp Neurol 490, 290-19.
  • Zheng, Q, Schaefer AM, Nonet ML (2011). Regulation of C. elegans presynaptic differentiation and neurite branching via a novel signaling pathway initiated by SAM-10. Development 138, 87-96.
  •      Luo S, Schaefer AM, Dour S, Nonet ML, The conserved LIM domain-containing focal adhesion protein ZYX-1 regulates synaptic maintenance in Caenorhaditis elegans. Development 2014: 141, 3922-33.

  • Zheng Q, Ahlawat S, Schaefer AM, Mahoney T, Koushika SP, Nonet ML, The Vesicle Protein SAM-4 Regulates the Processivity of Synaptic Vesicle Transport.  PLoS Genetics 2014:10, e1004644.

Dr. Schaefer is Executive Director of the Hope Center for Neurological Disorders and Director of the Office of Neuroscience Research (ONR).

As Executive Director of the Hope Center, Dr. Schaefer oversees day-to-day operations towards the Hope Center’s mission, namely, promoting collaborative research to better understand biological mechanisms of nerve cell degeneration, and mechanisms to facilitate repair. To achieve this mission, the Hope Center provides research dollars for funding, offers educational and training opportunities, and enables shared facilities for cutting-edge equipment and expertise.

Separately, Dr. Schaefer and colleagues established the ONR in 2008 to provide infrastructure for the broad expanse of Neuroscience research at Washington University, including the Hope Center. The ONR coordinates the annual Neuroscience Retreat, and ran the Neuroscience Colloquium, the first and only seminar series to represent all Neuroscience at Washington University.  Most recently, the ONR has expanded to address topics of Neuroscience and Society, namely, research on brain development, function and disease as they relate to societal issues.  This expanded effort includes a conference (fall 2017) and other events intended to create bridges outside our institution.